Commonly Misdiagnosed Pathologies: Arteriovenous Malformations
Figure 1: Axial MRI of the head demonstrating an arteriovenous malformation (arrow).

Commonly Misdiagnosed Pathologies: Arteriovenous Malformations

  The generally inaccessible locations of the salivary glands have traditionally led to challenges in accurate diagnosis and treatment of gland pathology. Although greatly improved in modern times, clinicians continue…

Continue Reading Commonly Misdiagnosed Pathologies: Arteriovenous Malformations
Salivary Gland Surgery: Sialocele Prevention
Figure 1: Special compressive dressings are placed temporarily during healing to reduce the likelihood of fluid leakage into surrounding tissues and subsequent sialocele formation.

Salivary Gland Surgery: Sialocele Prevention

  Can sialocele be prevented when undergoing salivary gland surgery? Question: I have been evaluated for a salivary gland mass by a head and neck surgeon and he has recommended…

Continue Reading Salivary Gland Surgery: Sialocele Prevention
Accessory Parotid Gland Tumor Surgery
Figure 1: Key point comparison of traditional parotidectomy vs. intraoral gland resection.

Accessory Parotid Gland Tumor Surgery

  Is there an alternative to parotidectomy for accessory parotid gland tumor surgery? Question: I recently made an appointment with my primary care physician because I began to experience swelling…

Continue Reading Accessory Parotid Gland Tumor Surgery
Sialendoscopy: Removal of Large Stones
Figure 1. Salivary gland stones counted and measured for display after removal from the ductal system via a sialendoscopy procedure performed at the Osborne Head and Neck Institute. After salivary stones are removed they are correlated with stones visualized on a preoperative CT scan.

Sialendoscopy: Removal of Large Stones

  Can large salivary gland stones be removed without surgery? Question: A few weeks ago I started to have pain and swelling along my lower jaw during eating. I also…

Continue Reading Sialendoscopy: Removal of Large Stones
Options After Unsuccessful Sialendoscopy
Figure 1. Salivary gland stones counted and measured for display after removal from the ductal system via a sialendoscopy procedure performed at the Osborne Head and Neck Institute. After salivary stones are removed they are correlated with stones visualized on a preoperative CT scan.

Options After Unsuccessful Sialendoscopy

Can I avoid surgery after a failed sialendoscopy? Question: I have a long history of salivary gland stones and conventional treatments have become ineffective. Recently I developed a large stone…

Continue Reading Options After Unsuccessful Sialendoscopy
Endoscopic Minimally Invasive Thyroidectomy
Figure 1. View of post-operative incision after minimally invasive endoscopic thyroidectomy.

Endoscopic Minimally Invasive Thyroidectomy

  Can unsightly thyroidectomy scars be avoided? Question: Over the past year I have developed symptoms of sweating, palpitations, high blood pressure and anxiety that my physician has said are…

Continue Reading Endoscopic Minimally Invasive Thyroidectomy