Paste your Google Webmaster Tools verification code here

Options After Unsuccessful Sialendoscopy

by Dr. Ryan Osborne

About Dr. Ryan Osborne

Ryan F. Osborne, M.D. is the Director of Head and Neck Surgery at OHNI and is an internationally renowned expert in head and neck oncology. He has developed a special interest for the treatment of parotid gland tumors and focuses on the use of minimally-invasive techniques in the care of patients needing parotid surgery.

View All Posts

About Dr. Jason Hamilton

Jason S. Hamilton, M.D. is the Director of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery for the Osborne Head and Neck Institute based at Cedar-Sinai Medical Towers. Dr. Hamilton has advanced training in plastic and reconstructive surgical techniques involving the face, head, and neck, and limits his practice to the treatment of these areas exclusively.

Can I avoid surgery after a failed sialendoscopy?

Question: I have a long history of salivary gland stones and conventional treatments have become ineffective. Recently I developed a large stone in my parotid gland that was unsuccessfully treated with sialendoscopy. I have been told that surgery is now the most suitable option due to the size of the stone. I want to avoid a parotidectomy surgery and its potential complications. Are there any alternatives to surgery after a failed sialendoscopy?

Answer: Surgery can be avoided after failed sialendoscopy by seeking treatment from a skilled salivary gland specialist. Sialendoscopy is a meticulous and precise procedure that is highly dependent on operator skill. Because of this, it is highly recommended that the procedure be performed by a physician that has specialized in removing stones of all sizes from the salivary glands.

Sialendoscopy is the gold standard treatment for persistent salivary gland stones. As a cutting edge and non-invasive technique, meticulous operator precision is a large factor in the outcome of this procedure. By using modern techniques and specialized equipment, sialendoscopy specialists can typically treat stones of any size that other providers have failed to remove. Through sialendoscopy, salivary gland specialists can help patients with persistent salivary gland stones avoid the potential dangers of invasive surgical approaches to treatment.

Figure 1. Salivary gland stones counted and measured for display after removal from the ductal system via a sialendoscopy procedure performed at the Osborne Head and Neck Institute. After salivary stones are removed they are correlated with stones visualized on a preoperative CT scan.

Figure 1. Salivary gland stones counted and measured for display after removal from the ductal system via a sialendoscopy procedure performed at the Osborne Head and Neck Institute. After salivary stones are removed they are correlated with stones visualized on a preoperative CT scan.

Traditional surgical techniques for salivary stone removal should be avoided due to the potential complications and dysfunction caused. The invasiveness of surgery typically disrupts delicate tissues and structures that surround the salivary gland in question. This typically includes the facial nerve, which if damaged during surgery can result in facial paralysis, changes in facial sensation, loss of taste, and disfigurement. In addition, surgical removal of the salivary gland can result in decreased salivary function and dry mouth. The aforementioned concerns have highlighted the need for modified sialendoscopy techniques to address salivary gland stones of all sizes.

Dr. Ryan Osborne, director of the Osborne Head and Neck Institute, has pioneered the use of minimally invasive sialendoscopy in treating persistent salivary gland stones. While other providers have been limited in their applications of sialendoscopy to smaller sized stones, Dr. Osborne has developed his own techniques and instrumentation for the treatment of stones of any size. Dr. Osborne has received international acclaim for his work as well as his advancement of sialendoscopy.

To learn more about your options after a failed sialendoscopy, please contact the Osborne Head and Neck Institute.

Key Facts:

  • Surgery can be avoided after failed sialendoscopy by seeking treatment from a skilled salivary gland specialist.
  • Sialendoscopy is a meticulous and precise procedure that is highly dependent on operator skill.
  • It is highly recommended that sialendoscopy be performed by a physician that has specialized in removing stones of all sizes from the salivary glands.
  • By using modern techniques and specialized equipment, sialendoscopy specialists can typically treat stones of any size that other providers have failed to remove.
  • Traditional surgical techniques for salivary stone removal should be avoided due to the potential complications and dysfunction caused.
  • Dr. Ryan Osborne, director of the Osborne Head and Neck Institute, has pioneered the use of minimally invasive sialendoscopy in treating persistent salivary gland stones.
  • While other providers have been limited in their applications of sialendoscopy to smaller sized salivary gland stones, Dr. Osborne has developed his own techniques and instrumentation for the treatment of stones of any size.

Contact a Physician at Osborne Head & Neck Institute

If you would like to speak with one of our physicians regarding this issue or another ear, nose, throat problem; or have other questions or concerns, please complete the contact form below or call us at 310-657-0123.

You May Also Like:

Previous post:

Next post: